Uluru: An Australian Must See

Uluru: An Australian Must See

Before coming to Australia I had never even heard of Uluru (Ayers Rock is the English name for it). And once I was told it was this giant rock in the middle of the Aussie Outback, I wrote it off. It wasn’t until I spent more time here and heard from a friend how amazing it was that I decided to give it a go — and I wish I had sooner! It truly is an incredible thing to see, way more than just the world’s biggest rock. It’s no wonder over 250,000 people visit it every year.

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

I had the opportunity to see it both at sunrise and sunset, as well as hike around the entire base! You technically are allowed to hike up the rock, weather permitting, but the aboriginal people that the rock belongs to, the Anangu, ask that you don’t as a sign of respect.

The designated spot to watch the sunset it perfect, it’s amazing to see the way the rock changes color as the sun goes down. I was able to capture a time-lapse of the sunset, but still doesn’t even do it justice:

The sunset is best enjoyed with a glass of champagne or a classic Aussie beer!

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See
The morning after I got up at the painfully early time of 4:30 am to see the sunrise and do the base walk. There is a designated sunrise watching spot much like the sunset, but according to my guide, it’s not the best spot to see it as the sun doesn’t directly raise on the side it faces.

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

The base walk is 10 km and takes about 3 hours to do. It’s an easy walk, very flat. You’d be amazed at how the landscape changes from one side to the other, and how different the rock looks at each angle.

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

There are several areas that are considered “sensitive sides,” which are important areas in the Anangu people’s stories and are not to be photographed. I just could not get over the contrast of the red earth with the blue sky.

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

About 2/3rds of the way around there is a watering hole that was sacred to the aboriginals and they have many stories surrounding it. The picture I got doesn’t do it justice.

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must SeeAfter finishing the walk, we went to the cultural center where photos weren’t allowed. It was interesting to see more of their stories surrounding the rock, as well as to see a lot of aboriginal art.

Lastly, we went up to the newly renovated sunrise viewing platform. This place is decked out — it even has free wifi. Unfortunately, our guide said there is hardly anyone ever there which may be due to the fact that it doesn’t really face the best side for the sunrise. Regardless, it’s a great place to see all of Uluru and even Kata Tjuta off in the background. You can see my epic fail of trying to do one of those cool perspective shots haha:

Uluru: An Australian Icon and Must See

If you’re in Australia, I really recommend you make the effort to go out and see Uluru as well as explore more of the country’s red center. 

xx Chels

Uluru: An Australian Must See

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4 thoughts on “Uluru: An Australian Must See

  1. Chelsea, These pictures are amazing, thanks for sharing!!

    On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 3:59 PM, One Chel of an Adventure wrote:

    > chelseabancroft posted: ” Before coming to Australia I had never even > heard of Uluru (Ayers Rock is the English name for it). And once I was told > it was this giant rock in the middle of the Aussie Outback, I wrote it off. > It wasn’t until I spent more time here and heard from a f” >

    Liked by 1 person

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